Finding Fulfillment

Finding Fulfillment

Fulfillment isn’t something we achieve but rather something that we experience from moment to moment.  Every art offers that possibility and most, if not all people drawn to the arts are looking for that fulfillment. Even if someone is simply drawn to the art of...
The Audience

The Audience

The audience is the most revered member of the theatre. Without an audience, there is no theatre. Every technique learned by the actor, every curtain and flat on the stage, every careful analysis by the director, every coordinated scene, is for the enjoyment of the...
Dignity Versus Recognition

Dignity Versus Recognition

There is a kind of nobility, or dignity, in art. This dignity is earned by the willingness of the artist to give up themselves. It is earned by their willingness and ability to give themselves over to the art, to the role, to the training, to the process, to the...
Impulse: Freedom in Performance

Impulse: Freedom in Performance

Learning to drop the plan and follow impulses is acquired learning. In the beginning, it feels like you’re throwing off a nice, warm blanket. You’ve worked through the scene, and you have it all planned out. You are lying all comfy in bed. And then, the blanket comes...
Struggling

Struggling

Learning to work through the struggle is an important part of the training process. If we turn away from the struggle, we save ourselves from that difficulty, but we also save ourselves from having learned what was there to be learned. Role Immersion is difficult....
Stanislavski on Concentration and Attention

Stanislavski on Concentration and Attention

“An actor should be observant not only on the stage, but also in real life. They should concentrate with all their being… they should look at an object not as any absent-minded passerby, but with penetration. Otherwise their whole creative method will...